GEOCODES



New Jersey Geographic Identification Codes




NOTES ON THE NJSDC

     This report was prepared by the New Jersey State Data Center (NJSDC).  The NJSDC is a
cooperative project of the State of New Jersey and the U.S. Bureau of the Census.  Serving data
users in the public, private, and academic sectors, the NJSDC has three main objectives:

     þ to expand access to and use of census and other statistics
     þ to provide technical assistance and analytical support in the use of these statistics
     þ to provide user training on timely, census-related topics.

     The NJSDC consists of a network of over 100 state, county, regional, and local agencies.  The
lead agency is housed within the Division of Labor Market and Demographic Research, New Jersey
Department of Labor.  For a complete list of the NJSDC contacts, write to: New Jersey State Data
Center, New Jersey Department of Labor, CN 388, Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0388.

     A variety of statistical reports from State and Federal agencies may be accessed through the
NJSDC network.  Most statistics are from the U.S. Bureau of the Census' regular and special
censuses and surveys.  The NJSDC publishes New Jersey data from the 1990 Census of population
and housing when they are available on a flow basis.  Data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics,
U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis and the New Jersey Department of Labor are also available
through the NJSDC.

     These data are made available in printed reports, on computer tapes, diskettes, microfiche,
and/or through an electronic bulletin board.  NJSDC Electronic Bulletin Board (NJSDC EBB) users
have access to up-to-date publicly available data for New Jersey in an electronic format.  For more
information on the NJSDC EBB, contact:  New Jersey State Data Center, New Jersey Department
of Labor, CN 388, Trenton, NJ  08625-0388.
INTRODUCTION

     The geographic codes in this manual represent standardized national and state codes for
political and statistical subdivisions within New Jersey.

     This publication contains two tables.  Table 1 presents Federal Information Processing
Standard (FIPS) codes for New Jersey, the metropolitan areas located at least partially in New Jersey
and all New Jersey counties.  Table 2 is organized by place within county subdivision within county. 
Three types of codes are presented in Table 2, two national codes (FIPS code and Census code) and
one state code.  FIPS codes are given for Metropolitan Areas (MA), Counties (CNTY), Minor Civil
Divisions (MCD) and Places (PLACE).  Census codes are presented for Minor Civil Divisions and
places and state codes are presented for Minor Civil Divisions.  (See "Geographic Classifications"
below for definitions.)  The "TYPE" column in Table 2 identifies Counties, Minor Civil Divisions and
Places.

     This publication is also available for $10.00 on diskette from the New Jersey State Data
Center, New Jersey Department of Labor, CN 388, Trenton, NJ  08625 (609/984-2595).


NATIONAL CODES 

     National codes in this index correspond to those used on 1990 census summary tapes and
TIGER\LineTM files.  Specific U.S. codes for states, counties and municipalities are part of the
Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS) system or codes developed by the U.S. Bureau of
the Census.

     Codes are identified as "census codes" only if there is also a FIPS code for the same
geographic entity.  A code that is not identified as either "census" or "FIPS" is usually a census code
for which there is no FIPS equivalent, or for which the Census Bureau does not use the FIPS code. 
The exceptions, which use only the FIPS code in census products, are county, congressional district,
and metropolitan area (that is, metropolitan statistical area, consolidated metropolitan statistical area,
and primary metropolitan statistical area).  


Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) Code 

     Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) codes are assigned for a variety of
geographic entities, including American Indian and Alaska Native area, congressional district, county,
county subdivision, metropolitan area, place, and state.  The structure, format, and meaning of FIPS
codes used in the census are shown in the 1990 census Geographic Identification Code Scheme; in
the data dictionary portion of the technical documentation for summary tape files, CD-ROM's, and
microfiche.  

     The objective of the FIPS codes is to improve the use of data resources of the Federal
Government and avoid unnecessary duplication and incompatibilities in the collection, processing, and
dissemination of data.





Census Code 

     Census codes are assigned for a variety of geographic entities, including American Indian and
Alaska Native area, census division, census region, county subdivision, place, state, urbanized area,
and voting district.  The structure, format, and meaning of census codes appear in the 1990 census
Geographic Identification Code Scheme; in the data dictionary portion of the technical
documentation for summary tape files, CD-ROM's, and microfiche.  


STATE CODES

     This manual also contains the standard identification codes for New Jersey counties and
municipalities.  These codes are the same as those issued on June 1, 1968 by Directive No. 3 from
the State Treasury dated May 27, 1968.  That directive stated "that all units of state government will
use these codes when providing information about New Jersey counties and municipalities to other
units of state government or to the federal government, industry, or the public."

     The state codes were developed through an interdepartmental statistical standardization
committee and were approved by the executive departments of New Jersey state government. 
Development of the codes was the result of requests from a number of agencies for a uniform state
and municipality identification system to simplify the exchange of information being collected within
state government.

     The state codes are only for county and municipal political jurisdictions.  They do not relate
to regional units such as utilities, school districts, joint courts or non-municipal health districts unless
the geographical jurisdiction is exactly the same as the political jurisdiction.

     These codes are maintained in the Division of Local Government Services of the Department
of Community Affairs.  The Department of State reports all changes in boundary, name, and form
of government to the Division of Local Government Services on a timely basis.

     Additional information on state standardized codes may be obtained from the Division of
Local Government Services, Office of Local Government Research, NJ Department of Community
Affairs (609/292-4584).


GEOGRAPHIC CLASSIFICATIONS


COUNTY (CNTY)

     The primary political divisions of most states are termed "counties."  Each county is assigned
a three-digit FIPS code that is unique within state.  These codes are assigned in alphabetical order
of county within State.

     All of New Jersey is covered by county governments and every county is entirely covered by
municipal governments.  There are 21 counties in New Jersey (see Table 1).  In Table 2, counties are
identified in the "TYPE" column and their FIPS codes are given in the "CNTY" column.


COUNTY SUBDIVISION 

     County subdivisions are the primary subdivisions of counties for the reporting of decennial
census data.  In New Jersey, county subdivisions are all minor civil divisions.  New Jersey geography
is unique in that there are no overlapping jurisdictions and there are no unincorporated areas in the
state.

     According to New Jersey state statute, there are 567 municipal governments in New Jersey,
all at an equal level on the state governmental hierarchy.  The statutes distinguish between
"municipalities" (a term which applies to cities, towns, boroughs, and villages) of which there are 320,
and "townships" of which there are 247.  On the census tapes, all 567 municipal governments are
defined as Minor Civil Divisions (see Minor Civil Division below).  In addition, the census almost
always defines the 320 cities, towns, boroughs and villages as places (see places below), but seldom -
- if ever -- defines townships as places.

     There are a number of instances where a borough or town is the hole surrounded by the
donut of a township; e.g. Hightstown borough is completely surrounded by East Windsor Township. 
As a result, in New Jersey, the MCD files tend to be more useful than the Place files, since it is only
unincorporated census-designated "places" which are omitted from these files.

     Each county subdivision is assigned a three-digit census code in alphabetical order within
county and a five-digit FIPS code in alphabetical order within State.  


Minor Civil Division (MCD) 

     In Table 2, Minor Civil Divisions are identified in the "TYPE" column while their FIPS and
Census codes are given in the "MCD" columns.

     Minor civil divisions (MCDs) are the primary political or administrative divisions of a county. 
MCDs represent many different kinds of legal entities with a wide variety of governmental and/or
administrative functions.  MCDs are variously designated as American Indian reservations, assessment
districts, boroughs, election districts, gores, grants, magisterial districts, parish governing authority
districts, plantations, precincts, purchases, supervisors' districts, towns, and townships.  The Census
Bureau recognizes MCDs in 28 States including New Jersey.

     The MCDs in 12 selected states (Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota,
New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Wisconsin) also
serve as general-purpose local governments.  The Census Bureau presents data for these MCDs in
all data products in which it provides data for places.


METROPOLITAN AREA (MA)

     FIPS codes for Metropolitan Areas are listed in Table 1 and in the "MA" column of Table
2.  The codes in this publication are for the Metropolitan Areas as defined by the U.S. Office of
Management and Budget as of June 30, 1993.

     The general concept of a metropolitan area (MA) is one of a large population nucleus,
together with adjacent communities that have a high degree of economic and social integration with
that nucleus.  Some MAs are defined around two or more nuclei.  (See Table 1 for a list of New
Jersey Metropolitan Areas).

     To meet the needs of various users, the standards provide for a flexible structure of
metropolitan definitions that classify an MA either as a metropolitan statistical area (MSA), or as a
consolidated metropolitan statistical area (CMSA) that is divided into primary metropolitan statistical
areas (PMSAs).  Documentation of the MA standards and how they are applied is available from the
Secretary, Federal Executive Committee on Metropolitan Areas, Population Division, U.S. Bureau
of the Census, Washington, DC 20233. 


Metropolitan Area Title and Code

     The title of an MSA contains the name of its largest central city and up to two additional city
names, provided that the additional places meet specified levels of population, employment, and
commuting.  Generally, a city with a population of 250,000 or more is in the title, regardless of other
criteria.

     The title of a PMSA may contain up to three place names, as determined above, or up to
three county names, sequenced in order of population. A CMSA title also may include up to three
names, the first of which generally is the most populous central city in the area. The second name
may be the first city or county name in the most populous remaining PMSA; the third name may be
the first city or county name in the next most populous PMSA. A regional designation may be
substituted for the second and/or third names in a CMSA title if such a designation is supported by
local opinion and is deemed to be unambiguous and suitable by the U.S. Office of Management and
Budget.

     The titles for all MAs also contain the name of each state in which the area is located. Each
metropolitan area is assigned a four-digit FIPS code, in alphabetical order nationwide. If the fourth
digit of the code is a "2," it identifies a CMSA. Additionally, there is a separate set of two-digit codes
for CMSAs, also assigned alphabetically.


PLACE 

     In Table 2, places are identified in the "TYPE" column while their FIPS and Census codes
are given in the "PLACE" columns.
     Places for the reporting of decennial census data include census designated places and
incorporated places.  Each place is assigned a four-digit census code that is unique within a state. 
Each place is also assigned a five-digit FIPS code that is unique within a state.  Both the census and
FIPS codes are assigned based on alphabetical order within a state.


Census Designated Place (CDP) 

     Census designated places (CDPs) are delineated for the decennial census as the statistical
counterparts of incorporated places.  CDPs comprise densely settled concentrations of population that
are identifiable by name, but are not legally incorporated places.  Their boundaries, which usually
coincide with visible features or the boundary of an adjacent incorporated place, have no legal status,
nor do these places have officials elected to serve traditional municipal functions.  CDP boundaries
may change with changes in the settlement pattern; a CDP with the same name as in previous
censuses does not necessarily have the same boundaries.  

     Beginning with the 1950 census, the U.S. Census Bureau, in cooperation with state agencies
and local census statistical areas committees, identified and delineated boundaries for CDPs.  In the
1990 census, the name of each such place is followed by "CDP."  (CDPs are identified accordingly
in this publication.)  In the 1980 census, "(CDP)" was used; in 1970, 1960, and 1950 censuses, these
places were identified by "(U)," meaning "unincorporated place." 

     To qualify as a CDP for the 1990 census, an unincorporated community must have met the
following criteria: 

          1.   In all states except Alaska and Hawaii, the U.S. Census Bureau used three
               population size criteria to designate a CDP.  These criteria are:

               a.   1,000 or more persons if outside the boundaries of an urbanized area
                    (UA) delineated for the 1980 census or a subsequent special census. 
                    

               b.   2,500 or more persons if inside the boundaries of a UA delineated for
                    the 1980 census or a subsequent special census.  

               c.   250 or more persons if outside the boundaries of a UA delineated for
                    the 1980 census or a subsequent special census, and within the official
                    boundaries of an American Indian reservation recognized for the 1990
                    census.  

          2.   In Alaska, 25 or more persons if outside a UA, and 2,500 or more persons if
               inside a UA delineated for the 1980 census or a subsequent special census.  

          3.   In Hawaii, 300 or more persons, regardless of whether the community is inside
               or outside a UA.  

     For the 1990 census, CDPs qualified on the basis of the population counts prepared for the
1990 Postcensus Local Review Program.  Because these counts were subject to change, a few CDPs
may have final population counts lower than the minimums shown above.



Incorporated Place 

     Incorporated places recognized in 1990 census data products are those reported to the U.S.
Census Bureau as legally in existence on January 1, 1990 under the laws of their respective states as
cities, boroughs, towns, and villages, with the following exceptions: the towns in the New England
states, New York, and Wisconsin, and the boroughs in New York are recognized as minor civil
divisions for census purposes; the boroughs in Alaska are county equivalents.

     New Jersey has 567 incorporated municipalities.  These municipalities cover the entire area
of the state without overlapping.  All 567 incorporated municipalities in New Jersey are presented
in Table 2.